IMPAKT-HiP (Investigations of Mobility, Physical Activity, and Knowledge in Hip Pain)

IMPAKT-HiP (Investigations of Mobility, Physical Activity, and Knowledge in Hip Pain)

Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition that can lead to pain, disability and the need for joint replacement. The cause of hip OA is not known. This research will explore whether a mild abnormality in the shape of the hip joint socket or ball shaped top of the thigh bone (or a combination of both) causes hip OA. The researchers will look to see if the hip bones bump into one another with certain movements. This problem is called Femoral Acetabular Impingement, or FAI. 15-25% of people have this deformity.

IMPAKT-HiP (Investigations of Mobility, Physical Activity, and Knowledge in Hip Pain) is a research study that looks at the relationship between hip pain and certain types of physical activities, a hip deformity called femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or the combination of both.

CHHM's Upright Open MRI Scanner scans the body in a range of weight bearing positions

We use our Upright Open MRI scanner to get a better look at people with and without these mild boney hip deformities. The unique thing about this MRI scanner is that images of people’s hips can be taken in many different positions. Perhaps this deformity combined with certain motion in the hip in daily activities is a mechanism for the onset of hip pain and hip OA.

What will be done?

140 people aged 20-50 will have MRI’s of their hips. CHHM researchers will look at positions where the joint is at the end of its movement, such as a full bend of the hip and rolling the hip inward.

We believe that by determining the cause of hip pain we can prevent hip damage and open the door to preventing hip osteoarthritis. This ground-breaking work is led by Drs. John Esdaile and David Wilson. The research team includes 14 top-level researchers across Canada and is a 5-year, $2.5 million project funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Lead PIs: Dr. John Esdaile and Dr. David Wilson