Join us for an interactive evening with research trainees from the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility featuring ‘hot off the press’ findings that aim to better understand mobility, bone and joint health, and quality of life of adults and older adults.

 

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

6:00 – 8:00 PM

Life Sciences Centre, University of British Columbia

2350 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3

This presentation is free to attend. Light refreshments will be available.

For more information and to RSVP, please contact:

Linda Skibo: linda.skibo@ubc.ca or 604.822.7250

 

 

Three of CHHM’s Leaders of Tomorrow will present:

FRACTURES! WHAT DOES THE ROAD TO FULL RECOVERY LOOK LIKE?

Presented by Kristin Brown

Kristin Brown is a Research Coordinator at the Centre for Hip Health and Mobility. A previous summer student at the Centre, Kristin graduated with distinction from UBC in May 2013 with a Bachelor of Science, Major in Biology. Her research interests are focused on addressing gaps in health care delivery through interdisciplinary collaboration and integration of patient perspectives.

LET’S TAKE A LOOK AT THAT KNEE JOINT! ARE ADVANCES IN MEDICAL IMAGING KEY TO MAINTAINING HEALTHY JOINTS?

Presented by Agnes d’Entremont

Agnes has a background in Mechanical Engineering, specializing in human joint mechanics and advanced medical imaging. In her doctoral work, she developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tools for measuring knee movement and cartilage health, and explored relationships between these measures in an osteoarthritis population before and after surgery. Her current research involves examining relationships between hip joint shape and cartilage health in childhood hip disorders using MRI.

“I JUST WANT TO BE ABLE TO PLAY WITH MY GRANDCHILDREN”: IS THERE A SECRET TO SUSTAINING OLDER ADULT MOBILITY?

Presented by Catherine Tong

Catherine has a background in Latin American Studies, and has worked and volunteered with several community-based health initiatives in Canada and Central America. Through these work experiences, she saw first-hand how issues of race, ethnicity and immigration can impact the health of an individual. Her doctoral research critically examines how ethnicity and the immigration experience impact the health and mobility of foreign-born older adults living in Metro Vancouver.